It's not the gender; it's the person!

5
After I described an ex-colleague's poor work attitude, my friend asked, "Let me guess: single, female, over 40 years old?"

He was right. But I don't think her age, gender and marital status resulted in her poor attitude; it's more the other way round. In my experience, there are many young, married people with poor work attitude and there are many single, female, over 40 years of age who have good work attitude.

"Female bosses are hard to work with!" another friend complained. Sure, I've encounter female bosses who have mood swings but there are male bosses with even more extreme mood swings! Out of the 10+ bosses I've worked for, I say with much certainty that the gender of the boss doesn't in any way determine the outcome of the relationship.

If you still think single women over 40 years of age and female bosses are difficult to work with, maybe you just happened to encounter only the difficult ones or perhaps it's a self-fulfilling prophecy.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

One someone once remarkd " They simply need a good f**k to put them into the right attitude".

David said...

Yu-Kym,

I have worked for a variety of women. Currently I have two different women on teams I support. They are only a few years apart in age, one is easy going, very coopertiv, and is a team builder.

The other is more demanding. Giving tasks and deadlines, and appears more interested in getting check marks in that to-do list.

Female bosses can be of all types.

Age has less to do than character and personality.

David

Paul said...

I think women in general are prone to be emotional at times. But of course there may be extenuating circumstances such as their family and marital problems which could have led them to behave this way.

Anonymous said...

I am a single lady in my late 30s and single, I will always choose a male boss over a female, even though I have bad experiences with male bosses and no serious issues with female bosses! Perhaps it's Cos my female bosses were all married? What do you think :-)
Red kitty

David said...

Yu-Kym,

I have given this further thought and after a discussion with my wife and other family memebers came up with this.

Many, if not all young people, spend 16 to 20 years in an education system where the majority of ones peers were born in the same 6 to 9 month time period. When these same young people leave formal education and enter the work force, they work in organizations where many of their new peers are old enough to be parents or grand-parents.

This exposure to a wide age range for coworkers is a shock to former students who spent many years in the cocoon of education.

David