Retail Therapy is an Oxymoron

6
Unless you are charging the cost of "therapy" to someone else's credit card (well, I am sure that comes with a different sort of price to pay), no real relief or lasting therapeutic effect can be gained from buying things. Assuming you are not someone who has too much money and nothing to do, after shopping you are going to get stressed about how to pay for what you bought!

The only people who can experience true shopping therapy are:
- those who have too much money and are bored, and
- those who are going to die and need to spend because they can't to bring their money with them to the grave.

So if people don't fall into either of the above categories, they are morons to practise "retail therapy"!

6 comments:

David said...

Yu-Kym,

We are of the same mind on this Retail therapy.

Calling such retail therapy a therapy is really so much physo-babble.

From Wikipedia:
Retail therapy is shopping with the primary purpose of improving the buyer's mood or disposition. Often seen in people during periods of depression or transition, it is normally a short-lived habit. Items purchased during periods of retail therapy are sometimes referred to as "comfort buys".

Retail therapy was first used as a term in the 1980s with the first reference being this sentence in the Chicago Tribune of Christmas Eve 1986: "We've become a nation measuring out our lives in shopping bags and nursing our psychic ills through retail therapy


I suspect that the need to shop is another type of addiction. Many people get into trouble using credit to purchase items they do not need, and might not ever use

The dept acquired still has to be paid and when money going out for payments exceeds income.

The result is a disaster.

Can you think of anything that is not an addiction now? ? ?

David

Paul said...

I think it depends on why the person takes up credit cards. I know why I took them up and it is not to go for a retail therapy.

Anonymous said...

Retail therapy is no different from feng shui therapy. Religious therapy is also no different from many other forms of "therapies"....eg charity or philantrophic therapy, dieting therapy, binge therapy, physical workout therapy, writing a blog therapy, abuse someone therapy, gambling, alcohol or drugs therapy, having a boyfriend or bearing a child therapy, sex therapy lol etc etc....all of which serves to address or affect to a certain extent the psychological, physical, emotional or spiritual state in a person.

Yu-Kym,

If you do not have at least a few of the above therapies to satisfy your own needs or attempt to influence the state of your well-being (whether perceived or actual), you must be a robot!

curious cat

CBS said...

Retail Therapy as in window shopping is fine. Unless you are out buying windows, that is.

Anonymous said...

Yu-Kym's take on who can experience true shopping is flawed:

What is True Shopping except that it must generate true happiness.

Ppl who have too much money and go shopping coz they are bored cant be said to find true happiness and therefore arent doing true shopping. They are bored.

Ppl about to die also fit the same category although this time they cant be happy doing true shopping knowing their time's about to arrive.

So what then is true shopping? Shopping without hang-ups of whatever kind. But is this achievable? I doubt so. All therapies, retail or otherwise have a price!

curious cat

Anonymous said...

Yu-Kym has just written a blog about less than satisfactory employers.

It appears that this is her form of therapy - writing a blog to release her angst against employers that seems to have an upper hand over employees (likely her own personal experience).

Is there any "real relief or lasting therapeutic effect" to be gained from her rantings about bad employers? Yes, I think so coz it stops her from degenerating into a psychotic mess. It keeps her calmer and saner.

Is she a moron to practise "blog therapy"?

No, absolutely not. She is as human as any other that practises other forms of therapy. She is just not too much into retail but into blog-rants therapy!

curious cat