Why I hate seeing a doctor

17
Whenever I mention any ailment, people will always ask, "Have you seen a doctor?" (Nothing wrong with that - what else can a person say in response to physical ailments.) Most of the time, I have not seen a doctor and have no intention to see one. Some people might shake their heads at me and wonder why I stubbornly refuse to see a doctor.

Other than my regular health screen and pap smear, I would rather not see a doctor. Today, I finally went to the clinic to consult a doctor. The experience helped refresh my memory as to why I hate seeing doctors.

Here are my reasons:
1. The queue
I queued from 9am and got out of the clinic at 11.20am. I have to go to appointed clinics to be covered by my company's medical policy. At 9am, the queue number I got was #9. The doctor started seeing patients at 9.30am. It is common practice for the doctor to come in 30 minutes after that clinic opens. Why can't the doctor come in at 9am, or open the clinic at 9.20am instead of 9am? I feel that making patients come early by half an hour is disrespect towards patients. True, the doctor's time is precious and patients are sometimes late for appointments. But in a general walk-in clinic where the doctor gets a confirmed queue daily, such practice should be abolished. Isn't the patients' time precious too?

2. The prescriptions
I'll always come home with pills and tablets that I don't need. Even if my company pays for it, I think it's a waste to take them. There are people in 3rd world countries who need medicine but can't get any, and here I am throwing away medicine after it expires.

3. Irritating TV
I had to watch Mickey Mouse, Xiao Ding Dang, a Chinese cartoon about fillial piety and a local show about a teenager who magically switched places with her mother to experience what it is like to be a mother. If they could screen something interesting like an X-Men movie perhaps waiting will not be so miserable.

4. Irritating patients
I was sneezing and blowing my nose but the lazy beside me didn't want to keep her baby away from me. No wonder she has to bring her baby to the doctor!

Going to the clinic will make any normal person sick and a sick person more sick!

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Strange....what does Yu-Kym mean when she says she ALWAYS comes home with medicine that she doesnt need?

There may be certain occasions when such may happen but I would hope just "occasional"!

But ALWAYS or ALMOST ALWAYS?

What kind of doctors has Yu-Kym been consulting? And what actually does Yu-Kym tell them to always be prescribed so called inappropriate medication? Or does Yu-Kym when she returns home always morph into a self-professed doctor who unprescribes medicines meant for her? lol

Something or someone may not be quite right here.

hmmmmmmm...I wonder..hehe

Nevertheless another engaging blog.

silli cat

David said...

Yu-Kym,

There are walk-in clinics in the U.S.A, but the majority of people recieve primary care at their doctors office. The longest I have ever waited is 25-40 minutes and there is no reason to queue up earlier since everyone has an appointment.

Walk-in clinics here people do experience longer waits.

I rarely come away with meds that are not needed. Either the doctors that care for you really do not know your medical history, or you are a non-compliant patient.

David

Yu-Kym said...

silli cat, it's always. They always give extras "just in case" and also so that they can make money from selling the pills.

David, it's common for people to have to wait more than an hour even if they made an appointment. And we are told that we have world-class health care here.

Anonymous said...

Yu-Kym,

An intelligent and outspoken woman like you allowing a doctor to prescribe medicines that you dont need and you walk away quietly? hmmmmmm.... why cant you probe a little further and see what the doctor says to your polite "clarification"!

If what you say is true (because I have seldom come across a doctor as described by you), I suggest you get to the bottom of things too. Let us know what you said to the doc and how he reply to you.

Yu-Kym, you certainly have the knack of getting into strange situations. But it's interesting how if such things happen, it happens only to certain ppl like you. I think maybe you once remark you look like a little girl! lol

Still, those who exploit little girls should be double-shot!

silli cat

Bing said...

What? The lazy beside you? No..

I think you are the one who should cover your mouth/nose when you sneeze or cough.

Ever heard of something called "cough/sneeze etiquette"?

You can cough/sneeze into your sleeve at the elbow.

Don't cough/sneeze into your bare hands because you will use that hand to touch the door knob/lift buttons/railings...etc.

Or sneeze into a tissue and make sure that the tissue cover your entire mouth and nose when you sneeze.

Or more convenient....wear a mask.

The person who is sick is supposed to wear a mask.

Yu-Kym said...

silli cat, if I argue, the doctor might not give me a medical certificate. I did argue against some pills at other clinics after I got the certificate in my hand.

Bing, where did you read about me Not covering my mouth/nose?

Anonymous said...

Yu-Kym,


At a GP's clinic, normally one knows what have been prescribed only upon payment. But even if you have been sounded by the doc during consultation, eg at the counter payment counter you could still politely explain why you have second thoughts with the original prescription and politely request the doc to take amendments. It is very likely the doctor will acede to you unless he feels that you are wrong. Whichever case, you would already have gotten your MC.

Yours is a strange explanation. And of course I dont think you are the sort that argue but reason.

silli cat

Yu-Kym said...

Some doctors will tell you upfront what medicine they are prescribing and explain which you need to complete the whole course of medication. I do ask when the doctor what he is prescribing because I want to avoid disputes at the counter, error or miscommunication about the purpose of certain medication by the clinic assistants.

David said...

Yu-Kym,

A patient should expect a doctor to be proactive in explaining why a medication is prescribed and how to take the medication. Such with food, at bedtime or a certian amount of time before or after a meal.

One should stop seeing any doctor who does do what I describe above.

Sadly some docs are pill pushers, they just want to get patients in and processed through the visit and then onto the next patient.

Such production line clinics or doctors are to be avoided.

David

Anonymous said...

Exactly David,

So I wonder why does Yu-Kym continue to consult doctors that push drugs to her that she do not need or do not feel comfortable.

Yu-Kym silly? Absolutely not! Stubborn? Perhaps!

So Yu-Kym, why not change your doctor and spare yourself the unnecessary frustration and expenses unless you are seeking fodder for your blogs. lol

silli cat

Yu-Kym said...

80% of doctors here are in the business of selling pills and/or medical leave. Their businesses survive because the demand for the service exists. I don't see a doctor often enough to locate the remaining 20% of the doctors plus have my medical bills covered by the company plus Not have to queue too long.

Anonymous said...

Yu-Kym,

I dont see doctors even twice a year and sometimes none and yet when I do consult one occasionally, I have never come across complaints like yours.

Even if I chance upon a doctor like the one you experience, if I find his recommendations unsuitable, either I put right the situation or I change doctors.

So how is it your problem persists? I can only surmise that you permit or encourage the problem to follow you.

Excuses Excuses! Change doctor lah Yu-Kym!

silli cat

David said...

Yu-Kym,

A sore knee last week resulted in me seeing our doctor. Our regular doctor was on holiday. One of her partners took the appointment.

I waited 15-20 minutes. The doc gave my knee a work over, had X-rays done, prescribed meds for the inflamation and pain. (600mg Ibruprofen three times each day for 21 days), along with excercises to improve specific muscles and remove a fluid build up.

Big differences on both sides of the Pacific.

David

Anonymous said...

David,

Any reason why the X-rays are absolutely necessary?

And does another party eg insurance etc pick up the tab of your whole consultation?

silli cat

David said...

SC,

The symptoms, swelling, fluid and positional pain were not specific to any one problem. The doctor wanted to learn if any bones or bone fragments were involved and the condition of the cartilage in the joint.

We have insurance through our employers that pay for the cost. We just paid a $25 UDS co-pay.

David

A science which does not bring us nearer to God is worthless.

-- Simone Weil

Anonymous said...

OIC David,

But I would have thought that X-rays would not be necessary at that juncture. Only a next step if your knee did not heal after the first treatment.

I guess only the doc would be the best judge of the situation. And only you would be in the position to suspect if there was any treatment overkill lol

I guess you dont bother coz its only a small co-payment right? lol

silli cat

David said...

SC,

A follow up for my left knee.

The swelling and pain are great reduced. There is in fact only occasional slight positional pain.

The course of treatment will be completed this week.

I will let everyone know if the problem returns.

Now I have to work on that extra mass along my waistline...

David