Reputation is everything at work

2
I think of myself as a person who doesn't care what other people say or think of me (there are people out there including my "friends" who dislike me or insult me). However, when it comes to work, I realise that I do care alot what my co-workers, clients and suppliers think of me. I've been asking myself why I care about my reputation at work. Here's the reason: Money.

As part of office politics, it's not uncommon for people to make false accusations. I asked some of my friends what they would do if someone makes accusations or allegations of them verbally or in writing, directly to them or with their bosses involved. Most of them would say that they would ignore the person. People would say that as long as I get my salary, why should I bother what others say about me?

I would always respond to false accusations because failing to respond means that I agree with that person. If such accusations are made in writing, they result in disciplinary action against me or compounded as reasons for my dismissal. At that time, it might be too late to explain why those accusations were groundless.

My reputation (and also quality of work and "value" I bring to the company, etc) affect:
- my increment, or worse still, I could get a pay cut,
- my bonus,
- my promotion,
- whether I have a job or not - I could get fired!
- my ability to find a new job (it's a small world and the word does get around).
Where money is concerned, I don't take anything lightly.

2 comments:

David said...

Yu-Kym,

You wise to stand up and face any false accusations.

Corporate/work cultures vary with every work organization. Is back stabbing to get ahead or get even common where you work?

I am fortunate to work where the team environmate is nurtured and built up.

Every team memeber is considered valualbe, and even noobs are valued.

Enjoy the weekend.

David

Yu-Kym said...

Back-stabbing is very common in Singapore, and I believe in other countries too. I think the extent of it in individual companies depends on whether the boss or higher management allows people to get away with it, or worse still reward such people with promotions.